Wednesday, March 18, 2015

Playing With Goo

My main reluctance with trying out Clear Cure Goo was the price. The kit is around $50 and I just couldn't justify spending that much for something I wasn't sure I'd like. I ran across a forum thread about people in the same boat I was. The thread pointed out that you could get a whole setup similar to the kit for around $25. The key is the UV curing light. I thought CCG required a special UV flash light but it turns out you can use just any old UV light that's similar. I found one on Amazon for $7 then bought both the flex and thick Goo for $11 each. I'm glad I watched this video first before attempting to use CCG. It saved me from wasting it.
There are a ton of videos online showing you different ways to manipulate the goo and tie a infinite number of patterns. I started covering the clousers I had with the goo to get a feel for how the stuff works. The CCG thick really does cure in about 5 seconds. I probably held the light way longer than I needed to just out of fear the fly wasn't cured. The fly had a tacky sticky feel to it after but that can be removed using Sally Hansen's Hard as Nails or rubbing alcohol. You do smell some fumes while the goo is curing. Not sure what kind of brain damage that is causing. Covering the clouser heads was pretty easy and I have to say they look pretty cool as well. 

My main goal for getting the goo was to tie some surf candies. I saw a few videos and it looked easy enough. I found right away after doing my first one that it definitely is not as easy as it looks. Especially using the CCG flex. the flex has a different consistency than the thick.The thick comes out like thick maple syrup and the flex comes out like neosporin. You can manipulate the thick by rotating the vise and have the material shape itself. With the flex you have to do more work. I tried manipulating the material with a bodkin and the applicator but it took more time than I liked. Each fly took about 8-10 minutes. I like how the flies turned out but they look like deformed bait fish.
The thing I love about the flex is the feel it gives to the fly. It's a rubber life like feel. The fly is squishy but firm at the same time. I think it really will make fish believe what they have eaten is alive and hold on to the fly longer. The candies were tied using EP 3D fibers. That's going to be a whole different blog post. I can't say I'd recommend them with the goo yet or not. I can tell you the stuff is strange and gets all over the place. I tied the foxy clousers on the right with the same stuff. I love how they turned out but I didn't use the goo with them. 
I'm tying all these flies for our family vacation. We're going to Florida and I'm hoping to have a arsenal built up for the surf and bays near where we're staying. I'll try to keep posting what I tie and my experiences with the different materials as I go.

9 comments:

  1. Kevin
    Awesome patterns you've tied up there, what weight and length fly rod are you using to cast these flies? I am using a bass bug line on my 7 wt. 9 ft. Sage rod to cast weighted type patterns such as you've tied here. The bug line keeps me from working so hard to reach the distance I need at times. Nice work at the bench---thanks for sharing

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    1. You could probably get away with casting this stuff with a 7wt. I would say that's the lightest you could go. I'm going to use a 9wt for these mainly because the surf is almost always windy. It's also less taxing on my body. I don't have to work so hard to get the flies a good distance. I'll use intermediate or sinking line. The baitfish patterns are tied with zero weight. I'm not sure how much they'll sink without sinking line.

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  2. Those are some good looking flies, Kevin. The CCG takes some time to get the hang of, but once you get more experience with it, you'll be a master. I am a big fan of thin, thick, and hydro. I use the hydro to finish flies that only need the whip finish secured, and to get rid of the tack that thin and thick have when cured. 1 coat of the hydro does it, and it will dry once you hit it with the light.

    If you look at my musky, pike, and baitfish patterns, I use thin, thick, and hydro to build the head. I use CCG all of time, so, it's become second nature to me on manipulating it.

    I have learned not to use the CCG for certain patterns such as the clouser. I still just use Sallys for those, and just hang the flies upside down to dry on my bobin holder arm.

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    1. Interesting Justin, have you tried the flex?

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    2. I do indeed have the flex, and I used it once for a bait fish pattern. I wasn't happy with the outcome, so, I never used it again. I just went looking for it, because, I wanted to give it a go on a different pattern, but I have no idea where I put it. For the flies that I regularly tie, flex is not needed. I'm sure once I do stumble upon my bottle, I'll seek out some patterns that are more suitable for it.

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  3. I only have the original Clear Cure Goo that I purchased several years ago. I also bought a very nice UV light on Ebay for about what you paid for yours. It's like magic, but I don't tie many flies that would be done justice by using it. Nice report Kev. Check out Jay Zimmerman's tying demo on Youtube using CCG.

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    1. Thanks Howard, I will check Jay's video out.

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  4. Nice ties, Kevin. I use Clear Cure Hydro all the time, but have found the others a pain to work with!

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    1. Phillip, I haven't played with the thick and flex enough to really judge them yet. Thank you for stopping by and leaving a comment. I might get the hydro some day.

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